Philosophy (PHIL)

Classes

PHIL 100: Introduction to Philosophy

Credits 3 Class Hours3 lecture
Description

In this course, students will be introduced to the nature of philosophical inquiry by considering some of the most fundamental questions that can be asked about the nature of reality, human beings and our knowledge of both: Does god exist? Do human beings have free will? What's the essence of personal identity? What does it mean to have knowledge? Can we know anything at all? Do human beings have an obligation to act morally? What makes a particular action moral or immoral?

Semester Offered Fall, Spring, Summer
Designation
Diversification: Humanities — DH
Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)
  1. Identify, discuss, critically analyze, and evaluate a range of important philosophical issues, terms, concepts, arguments, theories, and movements.
  2. Relate and apply various course insights to the beliefs and commitments that play a role in the development of a healthy, well-grounded world-view.
  3. Participate in thoughtful, critical dialogue with others by means of producing clear, cogent, and creative discourse.

PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy: Morals and Society

Credits 3 Class Hours3 lecture
Description

In this course, students will be introduced to the nature of philosophical inquiry by considering some of the most fundamental and controversial questions in moral philosophy: Do human beings have an obligation to act morally? Where do our moral principles come from? Are there objective moral truths? What makes a particular action moral or immoral?

Semester Offered Fall, Spring, Summer
Designation
Diversification: Humanities — DH
Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)
  1. Participate in thoughtful, critical dialogue with others by means of producing clear, cogent, and creative philosophical discourse.
  2. Identify, discuss, critically analyze, and evaluate a range of important philosophical issues, terms, concepts, arguments, theories, and movements within the field of ethics.
  3. Relate and apply various course insights to the beliefs and commitments that play a role in the development of a healthy, well-grounded world-view.

PHIL 102: Introduction to Philosophy: Asian Traditions

Credits 3 Class Hours3 lecture
Description

This course will explore issues and problems using a comparative philosophy methodology and Asian perspectives, such as Indian, Chinese, and Japanese traditions.

Semester Offered Spring, Fall, Summer
Designation
Diversification: Humanities — DH
Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)
  1. Apply course insights to a variety of contemporary issues.
  2. Identify and discuss contributions of schools of Asian philosophy and their influence through a historical perspective.
  3. Using a variety of comparative philosophy methodologies, identify, discuss, critically analyze, and evaluate a range of important philosophical issues, terms, concepts, arguments, theories, and movements focusing on Indian, Chinese, and Japanese traditions.

PHIL 103: Introduction to Philosophy: Environmental Philosophy

Credits 3 Class Hours3 lecture
Description

This course offers a critical examination of the history of multi-cultural philosophical and ethical systems and their implications for interactions with, and relationships between, humans and non-humans. The critical examination will take place in the context of contemporary environmental/ecological issues.

Semester Offered Fall, Spring, Summer
Designation
Foundations: Global and Multicultural Perspectives — FGB (1500 to modern times)
Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)
  1. Summarize key metaphysical and epistemological assumptions underlying different cultural conceptions of humans and non-humans.
  2. Critically discuss cultural differences in views about the proper relationship between humans and the environment.
  3. Clearly articulate a reflective point of view regarding personal responsibility on a range of ecologically/environmentally important issues.
  4. Identify a range of contemporary environmental/ecological problems impacting the local environment and offer concrete ideas on possible solutions.

PHIL 111: Introduction to Inductive Logic

Credits 3 Class Hours3 lecture
Description

This course focuses on the role of probability. It aims to help you understand and use probabilities, statistics, and risk evaluations, and more generally to safely draw inferences when your evidence leaves you unsure as to what is true. In today’s society, we are surrounded by the media’s use of probabilities and statistics, and most academic disciplines use them to analyze and present data. This course aims to help students better understand these data, which in turn helps us to make better decisions.

Semester Offered Fall, Spring
Designation
Foundations (Quantitative Reasoning) — FQ
Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)
  1. Critically evaluate the relevance and quality of statistical data in a variety of fields.
  2. Evaluate possible and probable decisions under conditions of risk and uncertainty.
  3. Explain some of the shortcomings and strengths of employing inductive quantification models in making knowledge claims and decisions.
  4. Create simple probability models, including diagrams and basic decision tables, to solve problems.
  5. Apply basic concepts in logic, inductive inference, probability, and decision theory.

PHIL 120: Science, Technology, and Values

Credits 3 Class Hours3 lecture
Description

This course addresses the relationship between science, technology, and human values with a focus on contemporary problems posed by developments in modern science. This course will include discussion on modern results and historical development of astronomy, evolution, and atomic theory as well as understanding the impact of cognitive and other values on world views.

Semester Offered Fall, Spring
Designation
Foundations: Global and Multicultural Perspectives — FGB (1500 to modern times)
Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)
  1. Identify and analyze assumptions and underlying points of view in different scientific methodologies.
  2. Apply philosophical theories to particular scientific advancements.
  3. Understand and use basic terminology of theories about the goals and progression of science.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of several theories in the philosophy of science.
  5. Reflect on, analyze and evaluate ethical dilemmas in science and technology.

PHIL 204: Philosophy and Film

Credits 3 Class Hours3 lecture
Description

In this course, students will watch a selection of movies and analyze them in light of the various philosophical ideas that they explore. Primary attention will be devoted to identifying, considering, and evaluating these philosophical ideas, the ways they are artistically presented in film, and their connections to both traditional philosophical problems and each student's personal world and life view.

Semester Offered Fall, Spring, Summer
Designation
Diversification: Humanities — DH
Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)
  1. Participate in thoughtful, critical dialogue with others by means of producing clear, cogent, and creative philosophical discourse.
  2. Relate and apply various course insights to the beliefs and commitments that play a role in the development of a healthy, well-grounded world-view.
  3. Identify, discuss, critically analyze, and evaluate a range of important philosophical issues, terms, concepts, arguments, theories, and movements as they are presented in movies.

PHIL 211: Ancient Philosophy

Credits 3 Class Hours3 lecture
Description

This course explores a range of important ideas, arguments, and theories advanced by such ancient Greek philosophers as the Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Hellenistic Stoics, Epicureans, and Skeptics. Using these thinkers, we will explore such timeless issues as what is the nature of reality and knowledge and what does it mean to be human, including what does it mean to be virtuous and good and what does it mean to love.

Semester Offered Fall, Spring, Summer
Designation
Diversification: Humanities — DH
Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)
  1. Participate in thoughtful, critical dialogue with others by means of producing clear, cogent, and creative philosophical discourse.
  2. Identify, discuss, critically analyze, and evaluate a range of important philosophical issues, terms, concepts, arguments, theories, and movements within ancient Greek philosophy.
  3. Relate and apply various course insights to the beliefs and commitments that play a role in the development of a healthy, well-grounded world-view.

PHIL 213: Modern Philosophy

Credits 3 Class Hours3 lecture
Description

In this course, students will be introduced to a range of important ideas, arguments, and theories advanced by such "modern" (17th-18th century) philosophers as Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Nietzsche, etc. Primary attention will be devoted to the so-called "rationalist" and "empiricist" traditions and the way these modern philosophical traditions considered fundamental questions about the nature of reality, human beings and our knowledge of both. Immanuel Kant's important critique of these traditions and the way his ideas influenced the development of subsequent philosophy also will be considered.

Semester Offered Fall, Spring
Designation
Diversification: Humanities — DH
Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)
  1. Relate and apply various course insights to the beliefs and commitments that play a role in the development of a healthy, well-grounded world-view.
  2. Identify, discuss, critically analyze, and evaluate a range of important philosophical issues, terms, concepts, arguments, theories, and movements within modern philosophy.
  3. Participate in thoughtful, critical dialogue with others by means of producing clear, cogent, and creative philosophical discourse.

PHIL 225: Philosophy of Activism

Credits 3 Class Hours3 lecture
Description

This course aims to improve understanding among students regarding basic rights and duties of citizens and the government including how to effect change. This will be addressed through the lens of philosophy. Students will engage in a philosophical analysis of law, rights, duties, citizenship, government, obligation, and social change.

Prerequisites

"C" or higher in ENG 100.

Semester Offered Fall, Spring (every even year)
Designation
Diversification: Humanities — DH
Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs)
  1. Relate and apply various course insights to the beliefs and commitments that play a role in the development of a healthy, well-grounded world-view
  2. Demonstrate thoughtful, critical dialogue with others by means of producing clear, cogent, and creative discourse
  3. Identify and critique the multiple and varied strategies people use to implement social change